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How to Get Relatives Interested in Family History – Episode 11 (Elevenses with Lisa)

How to Get Relatives Interested in Family History – Episode 11 (Elevenses with Lisa)

Live show air date: June 4, 2020

Episode 11 Video and Show Notes

Join me for Elevenses with Lisa, the online video series where we take a break, visit and learn.

 

Today’s Teacup

Chatsworth is home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, and has been passed down through 16 generations of the Cavendish family. The movie Pride and Prejudice (2005) was filmed there. In my cup: Blueberry Merlot by Tea Forte Herbal Retreat. You can get it here at Amazon (This is an affiliate link, so if you make a purchase we will be compensated at no additional cost to you. Thank you for supporting this free show!)

How to Get Relatives Interested in Family History

For me Family and faith have always been the answer for life’s challenges and turmoil. In this hour together we will recharge and look at ways to positively influence our family, now and in the future.

Preparing Your Relatives Now

Focus on ways to make the results of your research understandable by non-genealogists and create those items now. Make it a priority to share your findings in creative and simple ways as you go to help relatives understand the value of your research to you and them. You will have much more success down the road if you help build understanding today.

Sharing Ideas

Christmas Wreath and Crazy Quilt Christmas Stocking

Click here for the Genealogy Gems playlist that includes the 4 part instructional series on making these family history wreaths.

Crazy quilt a stocking and add transferred photos of your ancestors using T-shirt transfer paper.

Genealogy Christmas Stocking

Crazy quilt a stocking and add transferred photos of your ancestors.

Repurpose or upcycle items you already have

I turned an unfinished crocheted heirloom tablecloth into a vest for my daughter.

Upcycle an old crocheted tablecloth into a vest

I upcycled an old unfinished crocheted tablecloth into a vest

Genealogy Wall Charts

You can order genealogy wall charts through websites such as MyHeritage or Ancestry.

Here’s a free fan chart from FamilySearch. 

See all your options by Googling genealogy wall charts.

Embellished Picture Frames

Decorate an old picture frame with items reflecting the life of your ancestor featured in the photo.

Embellished family history photo frame

Embellish an old photo frame with vintage items that help tell the story of your ancestor.

Family History Wall Art

Make wall art like the matte canvas photo I made in episode 6 of Elevenses with Lisa. The show notes for that episode includes details. 

Posters from Family Photos

Get posters made of significant photos from the past. I ordered mine from Vista Print. If you sign up for a service’s newsletter you’ll likely get notification of sales and discount coupons. Poster frames can be ordered online through Amazon and stores like Michael’s or Hobby Lobby.

DIY photo turned into a poster

Celebrate the history of your family members!

Tabletop Family Story Displays

I took an old locker and filled it with items reflecting my husband’s story. You could also use a small cabinet, crate, basket, etc.

Coffee Table Books that Tell Your Family’s Story

In episode 206 of the Genealogy Gems Podcast I talk about how I made the book about my grandmother’s 50-year nursing career. 

Genealogy Gems Premium Members can listen to the Premium Podcast Episodes 52-54 which feature a 3-part series on publishing your family history.

family history books

Create short books that tell a single family history story.

Google Earth “Family History Tour”

Back in 2009 I pioneered a use for the free Google Earth program called “Family History Tours”. These tours take a little time but are fairly easy to create, and they make a big impact. You can download Google Earth Pro for free here. Then, watch my video below for a closer look at family history tours in Google Earth. 

Resources for learning how to create family history tours:

  • Google Earth for Genealogy step-by-step tutorial video series by Lisa Louise Cooke.
  • The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox (book)

Both available at the Genealogy Gems Store here. 

how to use google earth for genealogy

Over 2 1/2 hours of easy-to-follow instructions by Lisa Louise Cooke.

Get More Ideas at Pinterest

Check out my genealogy Pinterest boards here.  

Genealogy Pinterest boards

Follow me on Pinterest.

Family History Blog

Sharing your family history information on a blog gives you an easy way to cross-post on social media as well as be found by others how are Googling to find information on the same family lines.

Start a free blog at www.blogger.com. Watch my free instructional video series on how to set up your free blog at the Genealogy Gems YouTube channel.

Turn Family History Photos into Eye-Catching Memes

I use the Retype app. (About $2.99) 

Other free alternatives include apps like Adobe Spark Post or Over.

Add text to photos, customize the font and text color, and save. An easy way to access old family photos on your smartphone or tablet is to save copies of the photos to a free cloud service on your computer. Then open that app on your phone. Select a photo and save it to your device. Once the photo is in your Photos app, you can then open Retype and import that photo. Add text, font, color and more. 

Get more complete instructions and other mobile computing ideas like this from the book Mobile Genealogy: How to Use Your Smartphone or Tablet for Family History.

Genealogy is about the journey meme

Apps can turn family history photos into social media image that generate conversation.

Create a Video that Tells a Story

It’s easier than ever to create videos, and no special skills are required. Video is the #1 type of content on the Web and with the next generation. Get instructions and ideas here at Genealogy Gems. 

I trust all of my old home movies (8mm, VHS, mini DV, High-8, etc.) conversion and digitization to Larsen Digital. They do spectacular work! Click here for exclusive special discounts for Elevenses with Lisa fans!

The video below features one of my grandmother’s old home movies that Larsen Digital converted for me. And boy oh boy was I excited by what I discovered!

From You

Elevenses with Lisa viewer Jillian T. shared how she is bringing family history into her home office:

“I have tried to tune in each week to your Genealogy Gems ‘Elevenses’ (which is 5 pm here in Ireland and therefore a perfect end to my workday).  A few weeks ago, you shared how you found the photo of your husbands ancestors and through newspapers found out more about the musical troupe. You organized to have the photo printed on canvas and the finished project was wonderful.

I have always wishing to do a ‘family tree’ on the wall of my office but was afraid it would end up looking like an arts and crafts project. You gave me the kick I needed and decided, if not now, when?

So, I measured up the wall, researched and trawled through my vast collection of photos. I was very conscious that I have better historic photos on my ‘dads’ side with thanks to a wonderful elderly cousin who shares my passion. But as a genealogist, I wished to ensure I had balance and so decided only three photos from each ‘side’. I found a decal that was a good price (about $20) and the perfect size for my wall. I organised for the photos to be printed and mounted on canvas (more expensive but knew if the project didn’t work, I could find another use for the mounted photos).  

It took a few weeks for everything to arrive, as you will see in the attached, I did the base of the tree first – we called it the haunted tree as we had to wait another week for the photos to arrive. Then we took time deciding on the placing of the photos and then added the leaves.

I am writing to say a huge thank you. I will have this lovely project to remind me of this time, and as I sit here and type, it is lovely to know my family ‘has my back’.  

Thank you for your initiative of the weekly meet up. Your energy and enthusiasm are infectious. I met you at RootsTech in 2016 and have continued to follow you since. Thank you for all you do and to you and your family, let me share an old Irish blessing “May the road rise up to meet you. May the wind always be at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face, and rains fall soft upon your fields.

Warmest wishes, Stay smart, Jillian”

Family Tree Wall Art Display

Jillian’s ancestors “have her bacK” in her office!

Gayle P. shares some of the ways she protects her family history from destruction.  

“I have organized many things into books.  My living room is my grandma’s family history room and some of my grandchildren love to look through things. However, when I ask if they would be interested in having certain books, they ask me, “Grama, why don’t you scan it and give me a flash drive or CD.”  I decided to give memory flash drives for Christmas presents.  I feel relieved that I have several backups.   

 For example, while my son was serving a two-year mission in Germany, 1990-1992, he wrote faithfully every week.  30 years later, he is now working for the Air Force in Germany close to where he served his mission.

I scanned his letters and pictures he sent to me, organized them in books and sent them to him.  His children enjoy the scanned version of his memoirs.  He plans on revisiting many of the areas where he served 30 years ago.  He wrote four simple words that brought many tears:  “Mom, thank you forever.”

Another example is I have scanned and organized my pictures by years and share many of these years with my family.  Over Memorial Day, my daughter-in-law was in a panic because she could not retrieve her 2012 pictures.  She called and asked if I could share my 2012 pictures.  Within a short time, I was able to scan about 5000 pictures I had for that year and share with her.  I had many, many pictures of her daughter and her family.  Another “thank you forever” brought tears to my eyes.  

I currently have over 500,000 pictures/documents scanned and have three personal backups.   I am still have a lot to scan and probably will not get everything scanned before I die, but I am sharing what I have now so I know that some of my family will have a copy of my most treasured work and memories. 

Scanning and sharing a ton in Idaho, Gayle”

Now there’s a woman who doesn’t need a “round tuit”, and who is definitely a positive influence on her family!

Cathy G wrote a comment to ask about the templates I use for my notebook covers and spines. 

“Wonderful shows – really enjoying the elevenses. Such good information always. Especially enjoyed the ones on organizing paper and hard drive database. More please. One quick question: you mentioned printing your own binder covers and spines – can’t find a template in my Word program. Can you direct us to the one you use? Thanks.”

I’m happy to share my simple yet effective templates for the covers and spines on my notebooks. Genealogy Gems Premium members can now download these from the Resources section of the Elevenses with Lisa episode 6 show notes.

genealogy notebooks and binders

Gayle has been hard at work creating family history notebooks.

Watch My Free Presentation

Watch my free Facebook Live presentation of Fabulous Photo Discoveries at MyHeritage.

It’s all about finding and colorizing your old family photos. The video replay is available here at the MyHeritage Facebook page

Final Thoughts on Passing on Our Genealogy

I hope you enjoyed the ideas presented in this episode, and that you take action on at least one of them. It may be just what your relatives need to see the family history clearer.

That being said, even if no one else in your family cares right now or wants your genealogy, It’s ok. We’ve done all we can and the rest is out of our control.

If genealogy  has brought You joy, sharpened your mind, given you countless hours of amusement, connection, and satisfaction, then it’s all been worth it! No one can take that away from you.

And the way I look at it, when we get to heaven we’ll know a lot more people!

Next Episode of Elevenses with Lisa

Episode 12 will air Live on June 18, 2020 at the Genealogy Gems YouTube channel. After the live show, the episode will be available as a video. Show notes will be published on June 19. 

Click the video above to Set your reminder for episode 12, or click here. Please be sure to click our channel’s Subscribe button while you’re there. Then click the Notifications bell to so you’ll know when we post new videos and episodes. 

Subscribe and watch at the Genealogy Gems YouTube channel

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Click the bell too!

Stay smart and stay brave! Thanks so much for watching friend. I’ll talk to you soon.

Will you please do me a favor and take this quick 3 question survey about the show? Thanks! 

Resources (Premium Members): 

Click here to download the show notes PDF for this episode. (Log in required.)

 

 

 

Cross-Language Record Matching Announced by MyHeritage

Cross-Language Record Matching Announced by MyHeritage

Here’s the latest news from MyHeritage:

As many genealogists already know, MyHeritage is the website of choice for international genealogy, particularly in Europe. It is also extremely useful for U.S. genealogists whose ancestors arrived in the U.S. from other countries. This strength comes from the fact that MyHeritage is translated into 42 languages and is the most popular genealogy website in most non-English speaking countries, as well as having millions of international users who built family trees found only on MyHeritage, exclusive global record collections, and unique technology for overcoming language barriers.

We are working constantly to improve the technologies on MyHeritage even further and today, we’re delighted to announce a significant innovation: our Global Name Translation Technology™ has been extended to apply to Record Matches as well!

cross language

Individuals researching their heritage often face a language barrier when researching their ancestors who lived in another country. MyHeritage pioneered Global Name Translation Technology™ to help users overcome this barrier, by automatically translating names between languages. This unique capability, originally conceived by MyHeritage’s Founder and CEO, allows users to locate records that mention their ancestors in different and often unexpected languages (as well as in synonyms in each language). Initially, this was available in our search engine, SuperSearch™, and has now been extended to automatic Record Matches as well.

For example, if you search for an ancestor you know as Alexander, the algorithm may uncover a Spanish record where his name is listed as Alejandro (a Spanish version of Alexander), or a Russian record with the name written Александр in Cyrillic characters (the Russian way to write Alexander), or its common Russian nickname Саша (Sasha).

With this new addition, translated Record Matches are now calculated on an ongoing basis, and you’ll receive matches with historical records and family tree profiles in other languages. 

When you view them, the names will be conveniently spelled out using your own alphabet. You may already have noticed some records from other languages appearing in your matches.

This feature will help you easily locate records that would otherwise have been very difficult for you to find.

This unique technology is only available on MyHeritage and works hand in hand with our huge database of international records.

Get a New View of Your Genealogy Featuring an Interview with Pat Dalpiaz

Get a New View of Your Genealogy Featuring an Interview with Pat Dalpiaz

with Lisa Louise Cooke
Recorded May 2020
Please enjoy free access to this Premium podcast episode. Learn more about becoming a Genealogy Gems Premium member by clicking here

This episode is really about getting a fresh new view of our research and our ancestors’ world. To expand our view we’re going to dig into that word “view” in one of my favorite free tools,  Google books which contains some wonderful gems, and I’ll tell you how to find them. But first I chat with a Genealogy Gems Premium Member  about how her eyes were opened to a new view of her research, and 3 very important things she learned from it.

 

GEM: Interview with Pat Dalpiaz

In Genealogy Gems Podcast episode #238 I shared two tales of mystery. The first was a Valentine’s theme centered around a mysterious love letter. Professional genealogist Kathleen Ackerman shared how a love letter that was missing its last page took her on a genealogical journey full of surprises. And the second story was the mystery of a lost family scrapbook that was chock full of twists, turns and even murder! At the end of that episode I invited you to share your stories of discovery and the lessons you learned along the way. Long time listener and Genealogy Gems premium member Pat Dalpiaz did just that, and she joins me on this episode to tell us about it.

How did you first learn of the story of John Handran?
“John Handran of Newfoundland and Essex County Massachusetts was lost at sea in December of 1885 while aboard the Schooner Cleopatra. The story of that sea disaster is pretty amazing in itself. A brief version is told in the blog post I will reference and share. He left behind a wife and 3 young children.

He also left behind the story of his sea rescue of a fellow Navy shipmate who was swept overboard in Lisbon Portugal from the US Steamer Franklin in 1876, for which he was awarded a Medal of Honor by President U. S. Grant.

This story of his Medal of Honor had been a family story, accepted in full as given by another cousin researcher (expert level). So, I shared it on my blog Gathering the Cousins.”

What stirred the story back up?
“One day about 4 years ago, I was contacted by members of the Medal of Honor Historical Society of the United States as well as by a Canadian who specializes in honoring Canadians who have been awarded the US Medal of Honor. This came about directly as a result of publishing his story on my blog, a point made by others that I can help verify.

I was asked to determine if the John Handran in my family tree was THE John Handran who was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1876. Dope slap. I had never made that direct connection using documents and proof. I just accepted the story. So, the work began to collect the “smoking gun” documentation to prove “my” John Handran and the Medal of Honor John Handran.”

What approach did you take to try and verify this story?
“In 2017, I was finally able to locate a newspaper article regarding John’s death that stated he had been in the US Navy connecting him as needed. I found a copy of the 1885 local paper and shared it with the Medal of Honor Historical Society of the United States.”

What are you doing to restore this historical story to your community?
“As a result, they have been able to coordinate the placement of a “In Memory Of” marker at his widow’s grave in Gloucester Massachusetts. It took almost 3 years to accomplish that feat and then the virus interrupted plans to hold a service to mark John’s bravery and service to country.

In addition, I used some of your recommended Google techniques to locate a granddaughter nearby so she can be part of the service when it is held and visit the memorial when she’s ready.”

Where can listeners read more about this and your family history adventures?
“I also contribute to a blog called Good Morning Gloucester and have shared some of this information in that manner as well. Here’s a link to one of those posts.”

3 Lessons Learned:

  1. You don’t know what you don’t know.

Pat did not know there was a group out there specializing in something as specific as Canadians awarded the US Medal of Honor. Writing about the story on her family history blog brought them to her!

  1. The importance of validating those family stories.

The extra work you do to confirm your family stories might require close-reading very old newspapers or other similar documents. Pat says, “It might take a long time but stick with it.”

  1. Finding family members CAN be accomplished with Google!

Pat said she used the techniques that I talk about in the podcast and my book The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox on a regular basis, with ongoing success. She wrote: “Thank you as always for your efforts to share your expertise with us. I just renewed my Premium membership. It’s the most worthwhile genealogy money I spend each year!”

john handran plaque

John Handran In Memory Of plaque at Calvary Cemetery in Gloucester MA. An official ceremony will be planned as the pandemic allows.

 

john-handran-death-cape-ann-advertiser-jan-1-1886

The “smoking gun” part of the newspaper article Jan 1, 1886 in the Cape Ann Advertiser which accompanied a longer article about the Schooner Cleopatra sinking.

 

GEM: Expanding Your View with Google Books

Google Books URL: http://books.google.com

Google Books is a goldmine of genealogical resources including over 25 million books. Many of the books are fully digitized and available for free. In this episode we are focusing on getting a view of our ancestors’ world. Simply focusing on the word view can help us find old book that include photographs, illustrations, maps and more.

Try searches such as:

A view of Australia

An illustrated view of California

Once you identify a book of interest, use the thumbnail view button in the toolbar at the top of the screen (it looks like a checkerboard) to view many pages at one time. This will help make maps, photos, and other images easy to spot.

thumbnail view new york book

Thumbnail view of King’s View of New York City, 1903

Search Operators are symbols or words that narrow or broaden a search. Quotation Marks can be used when you want to search for an exact word or phrase.

Example: “illustrated view”

How to narrow your search results only to fully digitized books:

  1. Go to http://books.google.com
  2. Enter your search query and click the Search
  3. The results page will include all types of books – from fully digitized to no preview. Click the Search Tools button just below the search field.
  4. In the drop-down menu click the down arrow (under Any Books) and select Free Google eBooks.
  5. Your search results will now only include books that are fully digitized and freely available to use.

Here are just a few examples of books found using these strategies:

King’s Views of New York City,A.D.1903: 400 Views

The Ohio Railroad Guide, Illustrated: Cincinnati to Erie Via Columbus and Cleveland

Australia from a Woman’s Point of View By Jessie Ackermann, 1913 – Australia – 317 pages

View of Canada search results

An illustrated view of Canada search results

Illustrated view of California search results

 

Profile America: Scotch Tape History

Wednesday, May 27th. The difficulty of neatly painting cars two different colors led to the patenting of a universally practical product on this date in 1930. Five years earlier, Richard Drew, while working for the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, had developed an easy-to-peel, glue-backed masking tape. It considerably eased the task of separating two-tone paint jobs on new cars, which until then involved moistened plaster tape. Then, he expanded its use by introducing a clear backing. The result, an immediate hit, became known as Scotch Tape.

Now, 90 years on, 3M is joined by about 560 manufacturers of various adhesive products nationwide. This specialty generates sales of more than $13 billion a year and provides jobs for about 24,000 people.

Sources:

As you’ll remember I launched this show after the first week of the stay at home recommendation in March, and back then my first recommendation was that you resist the temptation to cut your own bangs. Well it turns out that Scotch tape has had a wide variety of uses throughout the last 90 years.

Nostalgia - cutting your bangs with scotch tape

Nostalgia – cutting your bangs with scotch tape

Scotch Tape in Old Newspapers:

 

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