November 24, 2017

Inexpensive DNA Health Reports: Recommended by Your DNA Guide

DNA health reports are becoming a more common option for those who test their DNA for family history. Should you order a DNA health report? Here are the ones Diahan Southard recommends most. Her top pick is inexpensive, available to all testers, and promises confidentiality for your genetic data.

DNA and Health

DNA Health Reports May Have Saved a Life

At Rootstech 2017 I was sitting at my booth answering questions and talking with many of you about your experience with genetic genealogy. A woman came up to the booth and exclaimed, “You saved my son’s life!”

She went on to explain that she had come across my booth at a previous RootsTech and engaged me in a discussion about using this kind of genetic genealogy test to find out more about a person’s health. I explained that while the focus of these genetic genealogy companies is to further our ancestral research, the DNA that they test does contain some health information. In fact, 23andMe used to offer a full health report as part of their service, but the FDA decided they better regulate that sort of thing, and put the kibosh on it. I told her that while 23andMe is slowly edging back into that arena, you can find out some interesting personal health information today, using the results from any of your genetic genealogy testing company.

How to Get DNA Health Reports

1. Download your results. The first step is to download your raw DNA data from wherever you were tested. Just as Lisa Louise Cooke is always encouraging us to be the owners of our own family tree data, we should be the owners of our own genetic data, too. Save a copy of your raw data to your computer. You can find instructions here on my website.

2. Choose a DNA health report provider and upload your DNA. A growing number of companies offer these reports. Within the genealogy industry, 23andMe sells them and recently Family Tree DNA began offering them to existing customers (more on that coming soon).

But the DNA health report provider I recommend the most is Promethease.com. Their service is available to anyone with a DNA sample–you don’t need to test with any specific company. It’s inexpensive: just $5. It’s easy, too. Just upload your sample and receive a one-time report. This report will tell you about various aspects of your health, including your predisposition to certain diseases and ailments, as well as your likely response or sensitivity to certain drugs. And the site promises confidentiality and impartiality, which are crucial in this age. The Promethease privacy statement states, “After 24 hours Promethease deletes all information about your raw genome. After 45 days Promethease deletes your Promethease report. At no time is your DNA data shared – or sold – to any external party, period. We also do not sell any products like vitamins or supplements.”

Here’s a screenshot of part of a sample report:

If you would like to read more about Promethease, I suggest reading over the ISOGG wiki page, paying special attention to blog posts by legal and genetic genealogy experts. There is also a Facebook group to ask and answer questions about Promethease.

One more option for DNA health tests that I want to bring to your attention: Livewello. At Livewello you can combine your own personal exploration of your genetics with the tracking of your family’s health. Livewello offers resources about these ailments and predispositions, as well as support groups and chat rooms for you to explore and ask questions. It does have a fee of $19.95 to join, and some of the feature reports do require a monthly subscription fee.

3. Remember that DNA health reports are in their infancy. It is critical to remember that research hasn’t even begun to scratch the surface of the complex way our genetics interact with other factors in order to make our bodies work. So whatever you see on these kinds of reports, take it for what it is: just information, not some kind of crystal ball. If you see something concerning, you may want to consider talking to a genetic counselor.

This woman at my booth found out some interesting information on Promethease, then consulted the professionals already involved in her son’s care, ultimately changing the course of his treatment, and she believes, saved his life.

As more and more people get genetic testing completed, more and more tools are becoming available to track your personal health history. Whatever you decided to do, please remember that your raw data contains your own personal information that does identify you uniquely from anyone else on the planet. While you shouldn’t be afraid to try new tools and explore your personal genomics, it is very important to read the privacy information of each company carefully to be sure you know what you are consenting to when you are uploading your data. Most companies are fastidious about privacy, but many are also involved in research endeavors, including pharmaceuticals, so please be aware before you upload.

As the genealogists in the family, we are the keepers of many important truths and documents, and certainly, that includes our important health information.

Your DNA is Part of Your Story

Watch this free webinar with Your DNA Guide Diahan Southard to learn more about the role your DNA plays in your story. Get inspired, get informed–and get digging into your DNA! Click on the video below to watch it now.

About Diahan Southard

Diahan Southard is Your DNA Guide here at Genealogy Gems! She has worked with the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation, and has been in the genetic genealogy industry since it has been an industry. She holds a degree in Microbiology and her creative side helps her break the science up into delicious bite-sized pieces for you. She's the author of our DNA guides Getting Started: Genetics for Genealogists, and Y Chromosome DNA for Genealogists (click STORE in the menu above)

Comments

  1. Diahan, thank you for your tips on how to get a DNA Health Report after having your DNA test for genetic genealogy purposes. I wonder, though, if the process can be accomplished in the opposite direction. If you have your genetic material tested for health testing, can you use the same results to acquire your genetic genealogy?
    Really enjoy reading your articles! Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

  2. Dear Janet,

    Unfortunately, no. The medical testing that is usually conducted is so minimal and targeted, that it cannot be used for genetic genealogy purposes. This is a one-way street!

  3. Mary Culloden says:

    Have you considered including some comparable Canadian content in your genealogy gems? I really enjoy your emails and print them out so I can relax and read them at my leisure. Thank you for the Best tips, Tricks and Tools that came from the Family Tree magazine.

  4. Thanks so much for stopping by, and I”m glad to hear you’re enjoying Genealogy Gems. Are you asking about comparing Canadian Health Report vendors? Or covering Canada in general? We do have over 60 articles on the site relating to Canadian research. On our home page select “Canadian” from the “Categories” menu.

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