Free Access to Irish Records on findmypast.com June 27-30, 2013

Here’s the latest from findmypast.com:

J. Duffy Publishers/public domain

“On June 30 1922, during the Irish Civil War, the Public Records Office of Ireland, located at the historic Four Courts in Dublin, caught fire. Tragically a considerable amount of Irish records were destroyed.

The fire has had lasting effects – still felt today – as Irish family history requires a unique approach to research than other heritages. To commemorate this anniversary and encourage exploration of Irish genealogy, findmypast.com will offer its full collection of Irish Birth, Marriage and Death indexes free of charge from June 27 to June 30. Anyone searching for their Irish ancestors can access the full Irish record collection by registering for free at findmypast.com.

Despite a great loss of records in the historic fire, there are still many opportunities to discover Irish heritage, with countless fascinating stories to be found from the records that survived.

MyHeritage Launches Colorized Photos!

Today MyHeritage launched MyHeritage In Color™ — a breakthrough new feature that automatically colorizes your black and white photos in seconds!

I’ve tried my hand at colorizing, both by hand many years ago, and more recently with software. It brings depth and life to old family photos. However, both methods are time-consuming. When making a choice between colorizing and more genealogy research, research definitely wins out. 

The exciting news is that we don’t have to make that choice any more. This amazing new technology from MyHeritage makes it almost instantaneous! These are going to make great conversation pieces both online and in person. 

Here’s the MyHeritage Announcement About MyHeritage In Color™ 

Based on deep learning technology, MyHeritage In Color™ brings your family history to life, revealing never-before-seen details — the results will blow you away! 

This feature uses the world’s most advanced technology for photo colorization, which is available exclusively on MyHeritage and is under license from DeOldify, created by Jason Antic and Dana Kelley. It allows you to do more than look at old photos — it lets you experience them, creating a deeper connection with your family history than you ever thought possible. 

A Commitment to Authentic Preservation

Moreover, as part of our commitment to preserving the authenticity of historical documents, colorized photos will appear with a special embossed palette symbol at the bottom left corner of the photo to differentiate them from images photographed originally in color. All original black and white photos will, of course, remain intact and are not changed by the colorization process. 

Symbol indicates the photo has been colorized

Supporting authentic preservation.

Use our new MyHeritage In Color™ page to upload photos to MyHeritage and colorize them instantly or scan in your photos using MyHeritage’s free mobile app. 

Examples of MyHeritage In Color™ Colorized Photos

Here are some incredible examples of historical photos that we’ve colorized using MyHeritage In Color™.

Before:

After:

 
Manager of the Alamo bar, and Mildred Irwin, entertainer – North Platte, Nebraska, 1938

Before:

After:

 
High school cadet marching band – Johannesburg, South Africa, early 1940s. Photo courtesy of Adam Fisher

Before:

After:

 
The Cow Boy

Before:

Family Dinner

After:

 dining_family_color

Family of Timothy Levy Crouch, a Rogerene Quaker, at their annual Thanksgiving Day dinner – Ledyard, Connecticut,

We sincerely hope that you enjoy bringing your family’s black and white photos to life with MyHeritage In Color™.

My Experience with MyHeritage In Color™

My husband has been peering over my shoulder, fascinated as I colorized old photos from his side of the family. I love what MyHeritage In Color™ did with the photo of Eddie Larson and his new bride:

myheritage photo colorization

And I’ve shared this photo of myhusband’s grandfather Raymond at his father’s motor works home business in England:

cooke before colorizing

And here it is after colorizing:

cooke after colorizing

 

Happy colorizing!

Join Me at MyHeritage LIVE in Oslo, Norway

myheritage liveIf you’d like to go global with your genealogy, the MyHeritage LIVE conference is for you!

MyHeritage just announced that registration is open, and I am honored to have been invited as one of the international guest speakers. I would love for you to join me in Oslo, Norway this November for a fantastic weekend of genealogy and fun.  

Here are all the exciting details from MyHeritage:  

We’re excited to announce that registration is now open foMyHeritage LIVE — our first ever international user conference!

MyHeritage LIVE will take place on the weekend of 2 – 4 November 2018 in Oslo, Norway and we’d love for you to attend.

Register now here

It’s open to anyone, from anywhere in the world, who would like to learn more about MyHeritage – including subscribers, DNA customers, those with free basic accounts, and those who haven’t used MyHeritage yet but would like to find out more.

The conference will feature a keynote speech from MyHeritage Founder and CEO, Gilad Japhet, international guest speakers and lectures from senior MyHeritage staff members. There will be three tracks: genealogy, DNA, and hands-on workshops, designed to suit all levels of experience, plus plenty of opportunities to ask questions and meet other MyHeritage users.

Tickets include entry to the Friday night reception, keynote speeches, and all conference sessions. They also include lunch and coffee breaks on Saturday and Sunday and entry to the exclusive MyHeritage LIVE party on Saturday night. Space is limited so please reserve your spot ASAP. Right now through September 24, you can register at their Early Bird discount price of just €75.00. 

The conference will be held at the Radisson Blu Scandinavia hotel, located in the center of Oslo, near the Royal Palace and its magnificent gardens. For a list of nearby hotels, details of how to get to the venue from Oslo airport and other information, please check the FAQs on the MyHeritage LIVE website.

We look forward to seeing you in Oslo!

DNA Circles – Here’s when they DON’T mean connections on AncestryDNA

DNA Circles at AncestryDNA can get problematic when participants’ trees are unverified. This is why.

Adding people to a family tree without verifying the connection is a fairly common genealogical practice. This happens a lot when people “graft” information from another online tree.

In addition to the problems this can create in your tree, it can create problems when you start looking at genetic connections. We have received a few inquiries about this topic here at Genealogy Gems, and I chatted with a fellow genealogist about this at a recent conference.

The practice of copying online trees factors most heavily in the DNA Circles and New Ancestor Discoveries (NAD) at AncestryDNA. You will remember from our previous conversations that these tools are like parties that your DNA has secured your tickets to attend. Each of these parties is “hosted” by one of your ancestors, in the case of the DNA circle, and a presumed ancestor, in the case of a NAD. Sometimes we catch ourselves declaring that our membership in the DNA circle “proves” our connection to the party host.

But we must be careful. Because it does not.

DNACircleExample“Proves” is too strong of a word. All your membership in the DNA circle can really tell you is that you have a genetic connection to those marked with the orange line. Those with the grey connecting lines have a DNA connection to some of the circle members, but not to you. Placing the name of an ancestor on the cover of this gathering does not guarantee that the named person is your common ancestor. It is just a suggestion; a hint.

Think about this for just a second. Let’s say that Joan does a bit of research and decides that her immigrant ancestor’s father is Marcus Reese, born in 1823 in Wales. She adds this to her pedigree chart. She sees on a census record that he had four children, one of whom shared the name of her ancestor, William, and adds those to her chart as well.

Months later, Charlotte is researching her Mary Reese and sees Mary listed on Joan’s pedigree chart as the child of Marcus. She knows Mary’s father was born in Wales and adds Marcus to her pedigree chart telling herself that she will go back later and double check. And so on.

After a while, we have 7 people all connected back through Marcus and his four children, and they all independently decided to get their DNA tested through Ancestry.com.

Ancestry sees their shared DNA and that they have all listed Marcus Reese as their common ancestor. So they create a DNA circle for the seven of them, with Marcus Reese at the head.

Ancestry did not look at the number of cited sources or the myriad of other genealogical possibilities about how these seven individuals could all be related to each other. It saw a genetic connection and a genealogical hypothesis, and it presented them to you in the form of a DNA circle.

The genetic evidence supports a single common ancestor for these 7 people, but it certainly does not have to be Marcus Reese.  You can become more certain as you gather the traditional genealogical evidence that you would in any other case. As your documentation mounts, so will your confidence, with the DNA acting like an invitation to keep searching for further evidence of your connection.

10 DNA Guides BundleIf you enjoyed this post, you’ll love my series of DNA for genealogy quick guides. Each laminated guide–with quick, clear text that helps you act on what you learn–is targeted to a specific DNA topic, from “Getting Started” to the three types of DNA tests you can take to understanding your results with testing companies AncestryDNA, FamilyTreeDNA and 23andMe. Why not grab the “super bundle” of all 10 guides? You can also shop for them individually here.

Disclosure: This article contains affiliate links and Genealogy Gems will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on these links (at no additional cost to you). Thank you for supporting Genealogy Gems!

Pin It on Pinterest

MENU