New Free Genealogy Records and Images at FamilySearch

When new genealogy records come online, they can be in different forms. Sometimes they are indexed records and sometime they are browse-only digital images.

Either way, new genealogy content online is always welcome. And this week this new content is free thanks to FamilySearch.

Family Search new records

Don’t let the fact that some of these genealogy records are currently browse-only images. in our article Browse Only Databases at FamilySearch are Easy to Use, we’ll help you navigate these types of records.  It’s not difficult to do, and the rewards can be big. 

Browse_Only_Database_at FamilySearch

Example of accessing browse-only digital images at FamilySearch

If you haven’t used FamilySearch before, all it requires is that you sign up for a free account which you can do here at their website

Here’s the latest press release from FamilySearch detailing the newest content. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—FamilySearch.org added over 13 million new, free, unindexed digital images of historical Italian records this week from Avellino, Belluno, Caserta, Matera, Verona, and Vicenza, Italy. Other indexed records include areas from Brazil, Germany, Peru, South Africa and the United States, including Alabama and Kansas.

Click here to search over 8 billion free names and record images catalogued on FamilySearch.

(Find and share this announcement online from the FamilySearch Newsroom.)

Brazil            

Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2016               
Indexed records: 162,706   
Added indexed records to an existing collection

Brazil, São Paulo, Civil Registration, 1925-1995                   
Indexed Records: 199     
Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany     

Germany, Baden, Archdiocese of Freiburg im Breisgau, Catholic Church Records, 1678-1930 
Indexed records: 1,045,113
Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany, Bavaria, Diocese of Augsburg, Catholic Church Records, 1615-1939
Indexed Records: 383,480 
Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy 

new records Italian genealogy records

Italy, Avellino, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809-1947
Digital Images: 3,099,458       
Added images to an existing collection

Italy, Belluno, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1815
Digital Images:  43,298 New browsable image collection.

Italy, Caserta, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809-1866
Digital Images:  4,543,698       
Added images to an existing collection

Italy, Matera, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809-1925
Digital Images: 1,323,614       
New browsable image collection.

Italy, Verona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1630-1942 
Digital Images: 2,796,910       
New browsable image collection.

Italy, Vicenza, Bassano del Grappa, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1871-1942 
Digital Images: 1,637,660   
Added images to an existing collection

Peru

Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996 
Digital Images: 175,257  
Added images to an existing collection

The records newly added to this collection have not yet been digitized. Click the clink at the bottom of the search page to browse. 

Click to browse genealogy records from Peru

Click to browse genealogy records from Peru

 

Here’s an example of what these Civil Registration record from Peru look like:

Example of Civil Registration records from Peru

Example of Civil Registration records from Peru

South Africa

South Africa, Natal, Passenger Lists, 1860-1911     
Indexed Records: 154,091  
Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States                                  

Alabama, Jefferson County Circuit Court Papers, 1870-1916
Indexed Records: 30,070
Added indexed records to an existing collection

Kansas, Grant County, Census Records, 1895-1982
Indexed Records: 87,928 0 
New indexed records collection

Example of a Kansas Grant Co Census Record at FamilySearch

An example of a record from the Kansas Grant County Census Record Collection

United States Census, 1880  
Digital Images: 13 
Added images to an existing collection

United States, Cemetery Abstracts    
Indexed Records: 179,757
Added indexed records to an existing collection

Share Your Findings

Did you find a genealogy gems in one of these new records at FamilySearch? Please leave a comment below. 

 

3 Sources for Historic Maps that May Surprise You

Old maps are an essential tool for discovering more about your family’s history. If you have exhausted more traditional sources, here are three places to find maps that may surprise you.

#1 Surprising Finds within the David Rumsey Map Collection

www.davidrumsey.com

You’re probably aware that the David Rumsey map collection website is a terrific source for old maps. But you may be surprised by the variety of maps, some which you likely don’t come across every day. Here’s a fun little tactic I took today to see what it may hold in store beyond typical maps. A search of the word neighborhood reveals that their holdings go well beyond traditional maps. Here’s an example from San Francisco showing a neighborhood in its infancy:
google earth maps for genealogy

And the image below depicts the Country Club district of Kansas City in the 1930s. If your family lived there at that time, this is a real gem.

Google earth for genealogy maps

#2 Google Books

www.books.google.com

If you think Google Books is just books, think again. Historic maps, often unique and very specific, can often be found within those digitized pages. Try running a Google search such as: neighborhood map baltimore. 

Click the MORE menu and select BOOKS. Then click the SEARCH TOOLS button at the top of the results list, and from the drop down menu select ANY BOOKS and then click FREE GOOGLE BOOKS:

baltimore search

Select a book that looks promising. Then rather than reading through the pages or scanning the index, save loads of time by clicking the thumbnail view button at the top of the book. This way you can do a quick visual scan for pages featuring maps!

baltimore history

When you find a page featuring a map, click it display it on a single page. You can now use the clipper tool built right in to Google Books to clip an image of the map. Other options include using Evernote (free) or Snagit ($).

Google Image search for maps google books

#3 Old Newspapers at Chronicling America

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

Like Google Books, the digitized pages housed at the Chronicling America website contain much more than just text. Old newspapers printed maps to help readers understand current events like the progress of war or the effect of a natural disaster. This map from The Tacoma Times in 1914 shows a map of Europe and several quick facts about the “Great War,” World War I:

The Tacoma Times, August 22, 1914. Image from Chronicling America. Click on image to visit webpage.

The Tacoma Times, August 22, 1914. Image from Chronicling America. Click on image to visit webpage.

Here’s one more example below. A search for “San Francisco earthquake” at Chronicling America brought up this bird’s eye view of San Francisco at the time of the major 1906 earthquake. Articles below the map explain what you’re seeing:

The Minneapolis Journal, April 19, 1906. Image at Chronicling America; click on image to see it there.

The Minneapolis Journal, April 19, 1906. Image at Chronicling America; click on image to see it there.

Learn more about using newspapers to understand your ancestors’ lives in my book, How to Find Your Family History in Newspapers. 

Want more inspiring ideas for finding historic maps? Below is my FREE 8-minute video on using Sanborn maps. This is an excerpt from my Genealogy Gems Premium video, “5 Ways to Enhance Your Genealogy Research with Old Maps.” (Premium membership required to watch that full video along with others like “Best Websites for Finding Historical Maps.”)

How to Find Original Manuscripts with ArchiveGrid

Original manuscript records may reveal genealogical gems about your ancestors. Find these old records in archives around the country using this little-known, free online tool: ArchiveGrid.

archivegrid

Manuscript records such as old diaries, letters, vital record collections, military documents, church registers, store ledgers, school and even business records can be genealogical gems. But finding original manuscript collections in archives and libraries can be difficult. Which archive has it? What’s the collection called? How can you access it?

ArchiveGrid can help

A little-known free website can help you locate old documents and manuscript items available in over 1,500 different archival collections. It’s called ArchiveGrid, and it currently includes close to 5 million archival item entries!

ArchiveGrid is a companion website to WorldCat, the free online catalog of millions of library items from thousands of libraries. The difference is that ArchiveGrid focuses not on published items but (generally-speaking) on unpublished ones.

How to search ArchiveGrid

From the ArchiveGrid home page, you can do two types of searches:

Search for repositories in ArchiveGrid

ArchiveGrid website

Use the map view, shown above on the left side, to identify archival collections that are near your ancestors’ home. These archives may hold materials related to your ancestors’ communities. Hover over the red markers to see the names of institutions. Click on them to find contact information and search their collections.

Search for specific manuscript items in ArchiveGrid

1. In the search box in the upper right part of the ArchiveGrid home page, enter search terms related to the manuscript items you hope to find, such as berks county pennsylvania marriage records. Then click Search. You’ll see a list of search results, such as these:

2. Browse search results. If you need to narrow or broaden your results, you can scroll to the bottom of the search results page and click the options you want.

3. Click on items of interest to read more about them. Here’s what a typical ArchiveGrid catalog entry looks like:

The entry tells you more about the individual item. You may see when it was created, a physical description of it, who or what organization created it, and even brief historical background. You’ll see what repository holds it–and you can click under the name of that repository for its contact information. You may be able to order copies, visit to view the item in person, or hire a local researcher to do that for you.

As you can see, a sidebar to the right of this catalog entry says More Like This, with categories like people, places, groups, or topics. These links point to additional catalog items that are related in some way to the one you’re looking at—it’s something like browsing the stacks by topic at a library. (You can also sort all your search results this way from the main list of search results by clicking on Summary View.)

Now that the Family History Library is discontinuing its microfilm lending program, you may find yourself increasingly searching for original manuscript items that aren’t available online. And now that you know how to use ArchiveGrid, you may find yourself wanting to seek out these genealogical gems even more!

Learn More About Original Records

Learn more about finding and using original records from our new regular contributor on the Genealogy Gems podcasts: “The Archive Lady” Melissa Barker. Hear a full-length interview with her in the free Genealogy Gems Podcast episode #205. Genealogy Gems Premium website members can hear even more from her on finding and using original records in the Genealogy Gems Premium Podcast episode #149.

Photos used in the collage in this post are courtesy of Melissa Barker.

 

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