Chilling Historical Video Footage Found in Online Archive

Eastland disasterA determined graduate student found some chilling historical video footage of a ship that capsized in Chicago. It was in an online archive–but he still had to dig deep for it!

Recently Gems fan Kathy sent us a story about an amazing video footage find. The subject line of her email caught my eye: “Gems can’t always be found by ‘panning:’ sometimes we have to ‘dig!'” She went on to say:

“You’re always stressing the importance of looking in the less obvious places but this is one of the best examples. Attached is an article about a horrific tragedy that happened in Chicago 100 years ago….It explains how video footage [about this disaster] was found in a British online newsreel–but it was not referenced under “Eastland,” the name of the ship, or “Chicago,” the location. We all like the easy way of finding things but finding gems sometimes takes digging and you just can’t pan for it.” (Click here to see the footage, though it may not be something everyone wants to watch.)

Thank you, Kathy! I often encourage people to dig for historical video footage (see Resources, below). Old footage shows us the past so compellingly! Also, did you notice that the video for a Chicago disaster was found in a British archive?? Not even the same country! Not too long ago, we blogged about how the media often picks up out-of-town stories. We may discover coverage about our relatives in newspapers and newsreels far from their homes. Just a tip to help YOU find more gems.

Resources:

My Most Amazing Find Ever: Family History on YouTube (No Kidding!)

Find Your Family History in the 1950s (tips for finding video footage)

6 Tips for Using YouTube for Family History

Read more

Premium Episode 55 – Google Earth for Genealogy Special

Date Published: Sept. 28, 2010

Click here to download the Show Notes pdf

This is a special Google Earth for Genealogy edition of the Premium Podcast featuring exclusive content from the brand new DVD Google Earth for Genealogy Volume II (watch this short video to see what the DVD includes.)

NEWS:

Google Earth for Genealogy
Now Available!  Google Earth for Genealogy Volume II DVD

Google Earth Edition of the News

New Google Earth Imagery added during the summer of 2010 features:

Europe:
Finland – Southern areas
Netherlands -Soest, Maarssen, Bussum, Vlaardingen

United States:
San Jose, CA
Sacramento, CA,
Des Moines, IA
Boston, MA
Las Vegas, NV
Seattle, WA
Waukegan (IL),
Portland (ME),
Tallahassee, and the Florida counties of Sarasota, Levy, Hernando, DeSoto and Martin

Canada:
Banff
Alert Bay

Summer 2010 Google Earth Update KMZ (update: no longer available)
(Right click to Save to your computer. When you double click it to open it will automatically launch Google Earth and will display all the new imagery areas in red which makes it easy to see if it affects any of your research areas.)

New maps at David Rumsey
Google Earth for Genealogy (Volume I) video series:
Video #2  – How to import and overlay an historic map from the Rumsey Historical Maps (within the Gallery Layer) onto the Google Earth globe.
Video #6 – How to create your own historic map overlays using those maps that you’ve found over the years.
Last spring davidrumsey.com added another 764 maps, and this summer of 2010 they added another 564.

When you find a map that you want to add to your own historic map collection in Google Earth just download it from the David Rumsey website to your computer, and then follow along with video 6 in the Google Earth for Genealogy (Volume I) video series to use it to create a custom overlay and size it up to fit exactly to the Google Earth globe.  Once save to Google Earth Places Panel you can access it any time you need it.

Browse all 564 new maps added during the summer of 2010

Browse the 764 new maps added Spring of 2010

How to Search the David Rumsey website: 
1. Go to davidrumsey.com
2. Click the Launch Collection in Luna Browser button or from the menu hover your mouse over View  Collection and select Luna Browser
3. From that page click the Launch Luna Browser button
4. To browse the collection hover your mouse over EXPLORE in the menu and select Browse All
5. Along the left hand column you’ll find categories to choose from
6. In the upper right corner of the page just type some keywords into the search box.
7. Just below the search box you’ll find an Advanced Search link.

19th century maps for children

The England Jurisdictions 1851 Interactive Map at FamilySearch
  England Jurisdictions 1851    

Library and Archives Canada new Land Petitions online database:
Library and Archives Canada (LAC)  “Upper Canada Land Petitions (1763 -1865).”
www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/upper-canada-land/index-e.html    

A bit of controversy – Google Earth and pools
Read the article

GEM: 3D Models for Google Earth.  An Interview with Ash Scott of Estate3D
Ash Scott, Owner of Estate3D

Visit Estate3D to learn more

PROFILE AMERICA:  Father of Space Flight

Read more

Tour Your Childhood Home with Google and Google Earth

Ever thought of visiting your childhood home? Here’s a story about people who are actually buying theirs back. For the rest of us, here’s how to use Google and Google Earth to revisit your childhood home and relive some memories–without spending a dime.

Tour Your Childhood Home with Google and Google Earth

Your childhood home–or perhaps another beloved family home–is your own personal address on Memory Lane. Who wouldn’t love to stroll up to its doors and recapture some memories?

The image above is of my husband’s great grandfather’s home in Winthrop, Minnesota. It’s a home that I have many photos of, have researched, and have come to feel personally connected to although I’ve never seen it in person. It’s one of many ancestral homes that I yearn to visit one day. So as you can imagine, I really enjoyed this report from The Wall Street Journal about a few lucky folks who are living the dream of not only visiting, but owning and restoring, their childhood home.

Even if you’re not interested in buying back an old family home, many of us are curious about the houses we used to love. Are those houses still there? What do they look like now? What else can we learn about them?

Let’s explore three ideas to help you stroll down memory lane. Then, I’ll share a discovery from a Genealogy Gems Premium podcast listener who recently dropped me a line.

1. Find the address for your childhood home

If you don’t recall the street address of your favorite family home, ask a relative or look it up. For U.S. addresses since 1940, you might start with the U.S. Public Records Index, searchable in part or full at Ancestry.com (volumes 1 and 2 for 1950-1993), FamilySearch.org or MyHeritage.com (click here to learn more about that database). Look also in records such as:

For U.S. addresses from 1880-1940, look to U.S. census records, which include street names and house numbers. In the example below from the 1930 census, you can see “Cedar Street” written vertically by the red arrow, and the house number written for each household entry, as shown in blue.

From the 1930 US census, Ancestry.com.

If you can’t find an address on an old record, but you think you could navigate yourself there on a map, it’s time to go to Google Earth and fly yourself there!

2. Use Google Earth to view your childhood home now

The Genealogist's Google Toolbox Second edition

Learn all these Google skills with step-by-step tutorials and video demonstrations in The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox book

Google Earth is your on-ramp to your own personal Memory Lane. Go to the site, enter an address, and watch yourself “fly” to that address. If you don’t know an exact address but you know where to look, enter a street name or even a city. Then zoom in to the neighborhood and street section of interest. Activate Street View, if it’s available. Not sure how to do that? Watch my free Google Earth for Genealogy Video Class to get started.

Once you’ve found the location, take a close look. Is the house still there? What does it look like now? How has the landscape changed? The neighborhood?

You can use Google Earth to revisit your own childhood home or another family landmark, such as an ancestor’s homestead or burial place. (Click here to read about one genealogist’s virtual trip to an ancestor’s business using Google Earth’s Street View, and click here to see how another genealogist used historical map overlays in Google Earth to identify an old home’s location.)

3. Google the address of your childhood home

Googling the address of your family home may produce unexpected and interesting results like these:

a) Sale listings. If your house has been on the market in recent years, you may be able to find a listing with great details, and even pictures of the inside today. Top Google search results from specific addresses often bring up real estate websites with varying degrees of information, such as square footage, current estimated value, year built, most recent sale date and price, and more. Weed through these entries to see whether Zillow or another similar site shows a current or past listing for sale or rent. These may contain more details and may even have interior and exterior pictures of the house as it is now.

Watch closely—Google may bring up houses nearby, not the one you’re looking for. But even a neighborhood listing for a house built on a similar floor plan may jog your memories of the home and may give you a sense of what the area is like now.

b) Historical information. A Google search result may bring up historical news coverage or obituaries from digitized newspaper websites like Newspapers.com (a subscription may be required to view these in full). Or you may find something really fascinating, like a discovery made by Genealogy Gems Premium member Heather. After listening to me talk about this subject in Premium Podcast episode 141 (click here to subscribe), Heather wrote me this email:

“I love listening to the podcasts while driving to and from work, often sharing my own thoughts with you.  This happened yesterday while listening to the latest Premium Podcast episode on family homes. I decided that I had to write and share what I managed to find! Since I have deep family roots in Connecticut back to 1650s, I managed to find a few family homes, but I started searching with the more recent generations and addresses that I knew. The two homes where my great-grandparents (Inez Hart and John Milton Burrall) and my great-grand aunts (Mary and Lucy Burrall) lived were written up in an application for the National Register of Historic Places!

The National Park Service is working on digitizing these applications. I found the application with a narrative description of the home and pictures of the interior and exterior. I have found other applications that have also included some genealogy of the family who lived in the home. Here is the website for the National Park Service and the database search page.”

Thanks for sending these in, Heather! And for sending along copies of the applications she found. The multi-page applications (more than 10 pages each!) include historical background on the buildings and former owners, as well as photos and site maps. Above is a photo–and below is an excerpt–from these applications.

When you’re ready for a full-fledged Google education, take a look at my top-selling book, The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, and my companion video tutorial series, Google Earth for Genealogy.

how to use google earth for genealogy

Get the downloadable video series at the Genealogy Gems Store

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links and Genealogy Gems will be compensated if you make a purchase (at no additional cost to you) after clicking on these links. Thank you for supporting Genealogy Gems!

Read more

Pin It on Pinterest

MENU