May 6, 2016

Lisa Louise Cooke Coming to Canada: Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2016

Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2016Lisa Louise Cooke will be a featured keynote presenter at the Ontario Genealogical Society conference 2016, June 3-5 in Toronto, Canada. 

The biggest genealogical event in Canada is coming–and Lisa Louise Cooke will be there! Members of all 34 branches and special interest groups of the Ontario Genealogical Society and other family historians from across North America and around the world will meet in Toronto from June 3-5, 2016 for inspiring lectures, workshops, displays, and other learning opportunities.

Here’s why people are excited about the Ontario conference:

As an internationally-renowned genealogy technology innovator, Lisa will deliver a plenary lecture relating to the conference’s theme, “On the Cutting Edge.” This Saturday morning keynote will be “Future Technology and Genealogy: 5 Strategies You Need.” The audience will be treated to a vision of genealogy research as technology speeds ahead into the future. Lisa will teach five key strategies to employ right now that will make the ride easier–and the results more exciting–than ever.

The Scoop

WHAT: Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2016
WHEN: June 3-5, 2016
WHERE:  International Plaza Hotel, 655 Dixon Road, Toronto
REGISTER: Click here for full conference information

Attend Lisa’s Sessions

  • “Using Google to Enhance Your Genealogy Research,” a workshop outlining a “Google Search Methodology for Genealogy.” The  workshop features a variety of free Google tools that can help solve genealogical challenges. You’ll also discover advanced Google search strategies you may not be using but are “must-haves” for high-quality Google search results. You will walk away with a proven Google search methodology, and powerful tips and tricks you can use right away.
  • “How to Create and Leverage Your Own YouTube Channel for Genealogy.” Don’t let the video revolution pass you by! YouTube Mobile receives more than 100 million views a day and is the #2 search engine on the planet. It’s becoming the first place many people turn to for answers, including fellow genealogists. Video content on your own website can also drive more traffic to your site. This presentation shares Lisa’s tips and tricks for creating a robust YouTube channel that will power-boost your genealogical efforts.

Lisa Louise Cooke signing booksVisit Lisa in the Exhibit Hall

Lisa will be in the exhibit hall at her booth (next to Shop the Hound) signing books, and answering questions. Lisa’s daughter Lacey will be there helping you at the booth. She will have special discounts and a money-saving conference bundle just for this conference.

You won’t want to miss the exhibit hall this year. OGS Conference 2016 will feature a spacious 10,000-square-foot Expo Hall, just steps away from the lecture rooms. There will be displays from genealogical and historical organizations, and commercial exhibitors. You’ll also have an opportunity to check in with all the various branches of OGS and see their specific publications.

About the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2016

The entire conference offers something for everyone, and with its convenient location in Toronto, is an easy over-the-border jaunt for many U.S. residents, too. Thursday’s preconference activities include a boot camp for librarians and a session on business skills for genealogists. Friday’s events include off-site tours (World War I history or genetics interest) and workshops including Lisa’s. Saturday’s calendar leads with Lisa’s keynote and then explodes into 24 concurrent sessions and other exciting sponsored events.

Registration

This quick link will take you right to online registration. There are full and partial registration options.

Can’t Make It to the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2016? Don’t Fret!

How to use Google for GenealogyWish you could catch Lisa’s Google search methodology workshop? Don’t worry–it’s fully described in her book, The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox. This 2nd edition was completed revised and updated for 2015, with thorough, step-by-step instructions on Google search techniques and new chapters on searching for common surnames, Google Scholar and Google Patents (yes, you can use these for genealogy!). Screenshots and detailed explanations will lead you through Google Alerts, Gmail, Google Books, Google Translate, YouTube and Google Earth (multiple chapters on THIS powerful 3D map).

Ancestral Landmark Discovery Using Google Earth for Family History

google earth for family hsitory and genealogy landmark findThom learned how to use Google Earth for family history after watching my free Google Earth for Genealogy video, and then made a landmark discovery: his ancestors’ pond, business and a photo of his family at work.

This Using Google Earth for Family History success story was recently sent in by Thom, a young genealogist who blogs at The Millennial Genealogist. Be sure to click on the picture that goes with his story–it’s really neat.

“I am writing to share with you a TOTAL (and entirely unexpected) success in using Google tools for my research. By way of introduction, I am a young genealogist (age 21) from Massachusetts. I recently discovered your podcast and have been working through the archived episodes on my daily 1.5 hour commute. I watched your Google Earth presentation last weekend, and had some time to try your tips out after work today.

My family has strong roots in North Attleboro, Bristol County, Massachusetts. So I decided that my first task would be to find a good historical map to overlay. A quick Google search yielded a 1943 USGS map of the greater Attleboro area on the University of New Hampshire website. Some quick adjustments left me with this great result:

attleboro map overlay google earth for family history

My curiosity having been piqued, I began exploring the map. I know that two sets of my second-great-grandparents, Bert Barrett and Grace Freeman, and James Adams and Elizabeth Todd, all lived near Oldtown Church (presently the First Congregational Church). I zoomed in:

Attleboro topo map google earth for family hsitory

Looking at Google’s current street names, Oldtown Church is right by the intersection of Mt. Hope and Old Post (you’ll note the small cross). Now keep following Mt. Hope Street – do you see what I see? Todd’s Pond! I just knew this couldn’t be a coincidence. So I went straight to Google again:

attleboro google search
​And the very first result, a page within a Google Book on the history of North Attleboro, was astonishing:

In the days before electric refrigeration, North Attleborough’s homes and stores relied upon ice harvested from either Whiting’s Pond or Todd’s Pond (depicted here). By the time this 1906 photograph was taken, farmers George, Henry, James, and William Todd found selling ice more profitable than farming and founded the Oldham Ice Co. Todd’s Pond was located on the westerly side of Old Post Road near the corner of Allen Avenue. The Oldtown Church is visible in the background.  -from North Attleborough by Bob Lanpher, Dorothea Donnelly and George Cunningham (Images of America series, Arcadia; click here to see the picture that goes with this photo, along with other pictures he found with a follow-up visit to the area)

The ice trade around New York; from top: ice houses on the Hudson River; ice barges being towed to New York; barges being unloaded; ocean steamship being supplied; ice being weighed; small customers being sold ice; the "uptown trade" to wealthier customers; an ice cellar being filled; by F. Ray, Harper's Weekly, 30 August 1884. Public domain image, Wikimedia Commons. Click to view.

The ice trade around New York; from top: ice houses on the Hudson River; ice barges being towed to New York; barges being unloaded; ocean steamship being supplied; ice being weighed; small customers being sold ice; the “uptown trade” to wealthier customers; an ice cellar being filled; by F. Ray, Harper’s Weekly, 30 August 1884. Public domain image, Wikimedia Commons. Click to view.

Mentioned by name are great-great-grandmother Elizabeth’s​ four brothers, George, Henry, James, and William Todd. What a spectacular find! I plan to reach out to the local museum that prepared the book to see if they can provide a better copy, and even additional media should I be so fortunate.

In short, I wanted to take a moment to say THANK YOU so very much! Had I not been exploring Google Earth at your suggestion, I’m not sure if I ever would have ever noticed “Todd’s Pond.”

I hope you are using Google Earth for family history! Paired with Google Books and the rest of rest of Google’s genealogy tool box, it can help you unearth fascinating facts about your family history. Here’s an image I found (using Google Images) that shows the process of harvesting ice, a profession long gone with the age of modern refrigeration.

Resources for Using Google Earth for Family History

In my book, The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, I’ll teach you how to use Google Earth for family history, along with Google Books, Google Images and more. Bundle it with my Google Earth for Genealogy video tutorial series for your complete Google Earth for family history education. Both are packed with step-by-step instructions and examples from my own family history research to inspire you. Google and all its powerful tools are FREE. Why not invest some time in learning to harness its power?

More Google Earth for Family History Success Stories

Alvie Discovers His Unknown Childhood Home: 4 Steps for Using Google Earth for Genealogy

Was This My Ancestor’s Neighborhood?

 

Lisa Louise Cooke Coming to CA: OCCGS Genealogy Bash

occgs genealogy bash Lisa Louise CookeAre you in or near Orange County, California? Come see Lisa Louise Cooke this weekend at the OCCGS Genealogy Bash!

On March 5, 2016, Lisa Louise Cooke will be speaking at the Orange County, California Genealogical Society. “A Day with Lisa Louise Cooke” Genealogy Bash and Book Faire will have something for everyone! Lisa will be giving four of her popular lectures:

  • Google Tools & Procedures for Solving Family History Mysteries
  • Google! Everything New that You Need to Know for Genealogy
  • How to Reopen and Work a Genealogical Cold Case
  • Future Technology and Genealogy

WHAT: Lisa Louise Cooke at the OCCGS Genealogy Bash
WHEN: March 5, 2016
WHERE: Huntington Beach Central Library, 7111 Talbert Ave., Huntington Beach, CA
REGISTER: Click here for more information

In addition to Lisa’s lectures, the OCCGS Genealogy Bash will offer:

  • A huge genealogy book sale (bargain prices for over 1000 books),
  • Free beginners classes (limited seating–see the society website) and
  • Chances to win fabulous prizes, including a year’s Ancestry World membership worth $300, a 3-day stay at the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel, and other prizes worth a total of $2000.

The day before, on March 4, Lisa will be at Aliso Viejo Library (OC Public Library system) in Laguna Hills, California. She’s teaching Google Earth for Genealogy at 10:00 am.

Attending both days will give you the ultimate Google for genealogy experience: Lisa’s Google search methodology PLUS her unique take on Google Earth. You’ll come away with powerful new tools and strategies for finding your family history in free Google resources that are literally at your fingertips every time you go online.

Google Earth for Genealogy and Toolbox bundleCan’t attend? You can still learn Google expertise from Lisa in her book The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox (2nd edition completely updated in 2015) and Google Earth for Genealogy, a 2-CD set that’s also available as a digital download. Purchase these products individually by clicking on the links above, or bundle and save!

More Google for Genealogy Gems

Google Earth for Genealogy: A Free Video Introduction

Google Search Tips 101: Keyword Search Tips

7 Google Search Features Everyone Should Use

Free Videos: Powerful Google for Genealogy Search Strategies

google for genealogy video classesBoost your Google search skills with these two free video classes on Google for genealogy, presented at RootsTech 2016 by Google expert Lisa Louise Cooke.

“Everyone should be using Google to search for their family history,” is Lisa Louise Cooke’s mantra. And her Google Search for Genealogy Methodology  is the path to follow.

Google search tools are free. They reach deep into so many different kinds of content on the internet. Google search tools help us discover ancestors’ names mentioned online; locate records we need; and discover historical details, images and maps that help us better understand their lives.

How to use Google for GenealogyLisa Louise Cooke taught two Google search classes at RootsTech 2016 that are now available to watch for FREE online. The class content comes from her book, The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox (2nd edition), which sold out at the conference but can still be purchased online here.

She packed a lot into these video classes. Watch them to learn how to use a proven Google search methodology to find your family history–and whatever else you’re looking for–online.

google search video testimonialThe first video below is Lisa’s RootsTech lecture, Proven Methodology for Using Google for Genealogy, which she delivered to a packed audience. Start with that one first! Kim wrote in with praise for Lisa’s lecture saying that the “class was the best one I’ve seen thru the free streaming [RootsTech] provided. You are such a naturally fantastic teacher, and your passion for genealogy shines thru like a real diamond. Thanks for sharing free content with those of us who can’t afford to spend any money on genealogy. I find it a real challenge to continue this pursuit with no money to spare. Kindness like yours is a real blessing.”

Lisa has a second free video to share, also shown below. She delivered it in the Expo Hall and live-streamed it through the Periscope app. (Click here or on the image below.) Check out the comments by those who were watching!

Google power strategies

More Google for Genealogy Gems

Google searching facetsGoogle Searching 101

7 Google Search Features You Should be Using

2 Mysterious Deaths in the Family? Time To Google Them!

 

 

 

This Friday: 2 Google Classes Streaming FREE from RootsTech 2016

periscope broadcastWon’t be at RootsTech? You can still watch Lisa Louise Cooke’s popular classes on using Google for genealogy for FREE online this Friday.

One of Lisa Louise Cooke’s most popular lecture topics is Google searching for genealogy. In fact, after teaching, she often hears back from people like Debbie, who recently emailed to say, “SOOOOO happy…I have had this brick wall for over ten years…couldn’t find a thing to prove a connection that I suspected. Thanks to a [webinar] by Lisa Louise Cooke, I found the solution to my brick wall yesterday! I was so ecstatic.”

That’s why I’m glad that not one but TWO of her classes on Google searching for genealogy will be live streaming this Friday for FREE. Here are the details:

“Proven Methodology for Using Google for Genealogy” at 1:30 pm MST. This is one of only 15 popular RootsTech classes that will be streaming at RootsTech.org. Go to their website to watch and to learn about other free streaming RootsTech sessions.

periscope iconGoogle Power Strategies at 5:45 pm MST. Lisa is teaching this class at our booth and will be streaming it live through Periscope.

Get the free Periscope app in Apple’s App Store or Google Play, sign up for a free account, and follow Lisa Louise Cooke to tune in.

Be sure to get the app and follow Lisa right away! This is our maiden voyage using Periscope, the live broadcasting app. If all goes well, we’ll stream live from the expo hall floor sporadically throughout the week in addition to this special Google session. If you sign up for notifications in Periscope you’re phone will “ping”

Mary Tedesco Genealogy Roadshow at Rootstech with Lisa Louise Cooke

Mary Tedesco from Genealogy Roadshow at Rootstech talks genealogy TV and Italian research with Lisa Louise Cooke at RootsTech.

It can be tough to choose from all the streaming classes, but don’t worry if you miss some of them! Amy Crow and Peggy Lauritzen will both be joining Lisa for YouTube videos on their streaming class topics, so you can catch the highlights later on the Genealogy Gems YouTube channel. That’s a great place to catch exclusive interviews like the one shown here with Mary Tedesco (click here to watch it!).

sign up newsletterSign up for the free Genealogy Gems newsletter at the top of this page (and receive a free Google search e-book!) to hear more about these and other “Genealogy Gems!”

 

 

Two Mysterious Deaths in the Family! Time to Use Google for Genealogy

magnify_custom_text_15168The mysterious deaths of a father and son present a perfect opportunity for using Google for genealogy.

Recently I heard from Lydia, who has just started listening to my podcasts. She asked a great question that Google can help answer:

“I have two relatives, great-grandfather and great-great-grandfather, who died under conditions where an inquest was conducted. I wrote to the county clerk’s office in Joplin, MO. They were only able to send me the “bill” for both inquests, stating they had no other information. What I want to know, what they didn’t answer, was are they the ones to ask for the inquest report? If it still exists who would have it?”

She shared their names (both Esterline) and details about their deaths and I just couldn’t help myself: I had to Google them myself. There’s nothing like a couple of mysterious deaths–two generations in a row!–to pique my curiosity.

Here’s the path I took and take-home tips to offer anyone looking for genealogical records:

google for genealogy quote1) A Google search for: coroner’s inquest 1928 Missouri delivered the Coroner’s Inquest database at the Missouri Digital Heritage archive. From there, you discover that you can request copies of records by emailing the citation for the record you want to the Missouri State Archives at archref@sos.mo.gov. According to the instructions, “The record will be located, the number of pages counted, and you will be notified by email of the cost of the copies. Upon receipt of a check, the copies will be made and mailed to you. There may also be additional notations in the record about other locations where the files can be accessed.” Interestingly, when I searched for her two relatives, I didn’t find them, but there was a file for a woman with the same surname: Esterline. It’s worth seeing if she’s related somehow.

2) I was suspicious about no other Esterlines coming up in the database, so I tried a search in the Archives on Joplin and Jasper to see if other cases from that town or county come up in the results, and they don’t. Further digging reveals: “The Coroner’s Inquest Database project is ongoing; additional counties will be added to the database as completed.” However, it would be very worthwhile to contact them by email and inquire as to where this county is in the queue and where the physical files are now. Another result in that same Google search reveals which counties the Archive currently does have: includes Andrew, Cape Girardeau, Clinton, Cole, Greene, Pemiscot, Perry, St. Charles, St. Francois, St. Louis, and Stoddard (coverage varies by county).

3) After searching a single database on a website like Missouri Digital Heritage, I always look for a global search page, where I can search all databases on the site at once. Missouri Digital Heritage has one here. A search on Esterline brings up not only death certificates (which you probably already have) but city directory entries, newspapers and more.

4) I always recommend that genealogists get to know their record sources. Again, through my Google search I discovered The Laws of Missouri Relating to Inquests and Coroners (1945). This may provide some further insight. And the FamilySearch Wiki is always invaluable. Here’s the page on Missouri Vital Records and it states that “original records are available on microfilm at the Missouri State Archives.”

5) I pretty much always do a quick search specifically at Google Books since they have over 25 million books. I searched Ben Esterline and the first result was a listing in the Annual Report of the Bureau of the Mines (1932) (the year he died!): “FATAL ACCIDENTS— LEAD AND ZINC MINES Ben Esterline, prospector.” The book is not fully digitized in Google Books, but click “Libraries that have it” and you’ll be taken to the card catalog listing in WorldCat which will show you where you can obtain it.

Genealogists Google Toolbox 2nd edition coverI’m telling you, Google is the most powerful, flexible, furthest-reaching free genealogy search engine out there—and it’s right at our fingertips! But you do need to learn how to use it effectively, or you could find yourself wading through 87,400 results for an ancestor like “Ben Esterline.” Instead, learn the strategies I teach in The Google’s Genealogist Toolbox. This second edition–new in 2015–is fully updated and loaded with  techniques and examples on search strategies and tools that help you use Google for genealogy (and everything else in your life!). Click here to order your copy and you’ll start Google searching much smarter, much sooner.

More Gems on Google for Genealogy

7 Free Search Strategies Every Genealogist Should Use

Google Keyword Search Tips

How to Make Google Cache Pay Off in Your Genealogy Research

 

Celebrating 1000 Genealogy Blog Posts: #6 in the Top 10 Countdown

n Genealogy Coundown #6We use Google for everything, especially genealogy. From the response we had to our #6 genealogy blog post, I guess many of you love that idea!

Lisa is well-known for teaching genealogists to harness the power of Google to search for ancestors  online. Earlier this year, she shared this post to remind everyone that Google searching isn’t just about using the search box (though that’s a great start).

Google searching facetsIn fact, you can use different facets of Google to schedule your favorite searches to run 24/7. You can digitally dig into books, running an OCR search instead of tracking down the book in print and hoping it has a good index. You can find images, news articles and even scholarly articles that may shed more light on your family’s past. Click here to read the post and see how!

Want to see an example of how to use Google searches to locate missing record types? Click here to see how we taught one Gems follower to do just that. Want to read more inspiring posts like these? Click here to scroll through a run-down of all our Google posts.

Genealogists Google Toolbox 2nd edition coverFor the ultimate Google for genealogy education, purchase The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox. This fully-revised 2nd edition for 2015 is packed with hundreds of time-saving, ancestor-discovering Google strategies.

 

Genealogy Gems Premium Podcast Episode 128 Is Ready for YOU!

Genealogy Gems Premium podcast 128Courthouse research tips, adoption search strategies, an inspiring Google search success story, an important (but little-used) U.S. record type and more are packed into the newest episode of the Genealogy Gems Premium podcast.

The Genealogy Gems Premium podcast episode 128 is ready for the listening pleasure of Genealogy Gems Premium website members!

One of our listeners sent in a question with a fascinating research problem. She’s an adoption “search angel,” someone who helps adoptees connect with birth roots. She describes her current research, which involves her own spreadsheet of FamilySearch data and an advanced Google search question on finding obituaries. I gave her some guidance that could help anyone looking for obituaries online.

That’s just the first segment in this episode of the podcast! You’ll also hear some great courthouse research tips with Gems Contributing Editor Sunny Morton, who wrote the curriculum for the Family Tree University course called Courthouse Research Made Easy. You’ll hear a letter from a listener with his inspiring “Google for genealogy” success story and a spotlight on state and regional census records. And our resident DNA expert Diahan Southard joins us to explain New Ancestry Discoveries at AncestryDNA.

About the Genealogy Gems Premium Podcast

GGP thanks for sharingThe Genealogy Gems Premium podcast is a monthly podcast available exclusively to Genealogy Gems Premium website members. It’s similar in format to our free monthly Genealogy Gems podcast, but you get MORE news, stories, and in-depth interviews to inform and inspire your own family history research. Premium website members also have access to more than two dozen video tutorials that will also help take your research to the next step. Click here to learn more about Genealogy Gems Premium membership.

Google Alerts for Genealogy: “Not What They Used to Be?”

Google Alerts

Do you ever feel like Google Alerts aren’t what they used to be? Or have you never used them? It’s time to revisit your strategy for using Google Alerts for genealogy!

Google Alerts are customized, automated Google keyword searches. You can set them up to constantly search the Internet for new mentions of your ancestors, their hometowns or anything else.

The key to Google Alerts is that they tell us about NEW material. After an initial barrage of results, you may not see anything for awhile, especially for very specific topics. Don’t get discouraged! Google Alerts are long-term strategies for finding family history. And Alerts will at least let you know as soon as someone puts something new online–which won’t happen if you just do your own searches every so often.

If you haven’t gotten results for a while, consider modifying your keyword search terms. Set up multiple searches, if you feel like that might help!

All editing of alerts is done in the Google Alerts dashboard. Here’s how to edit a Google Alert:

1. Go to Google Alerts and sign in to your account.
Google Alerts edit2. Locate the alert you want to edit in the alphabetical list and click the Edit icon that looks like a pencil (shown here).
3. Make the desired changes in the edit window.
4. When you’re done, click the Update Alert

How to use Google for GenealogyGoogle Alerts offer genealogists a rare opportunity to get more done in less time. That’s why in the 2nd edition of my book The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox (totally revised for 2015!) I devoted an entire chapter on how to use Google Alerts effectively for genealogy. In that chapter, I suggest several different types of alerts you may want to create. For example, with what businesses, churches, schools and other organizations were your ancestors affiliated? Create alerts with their surnames and the names of these organizations. You’ll find several more suggestions in that chapter that will help you get the MOST out of Google Alerts!

Additional Resources

How to Set Up Google Alerts for Genealogy

A Fabulous Use for Google Alerts (Finding Homes My Great-Grandfather Built) in the FREE Genealogy Gems Podcast Episode 146 (listen and/or read the show notes)

Google Alerts for genealogy and family historyWho else do you know who should be using Google Alerts? (Like, just about everyone?) Will you please share this post with them? Just copy and paste the URL into an email address or share with your favorite social media platform, like Facebook or Pinterest. Thank you!

 

 

 

Here’s How You Can Bring Your Family History to a Big Screen: How to Use Chromecast

display family history photos on TV with ChromecastHere at Genealogy Gems we love using Google for genealogy. Today we have another exciting Google resource that can transform how you share your genealogy with your family – because ultimately, genealogy is all about sharing your family’s story!

While the mobile device era has made communication and sharing easy and instant, sometimes it’s hard to really see the ‘big picture’ on our tiny screens. And crowding around the computer monitor isn’t much better. Chromecast by Google is a tool that allows you to stream content from your mobile devices and computers directly onto your TV!

You can share slideshows, photos, videos, and more while everyone is seated comfortably in the living room. If you are looking for an easy and inviting way for your family to enjoy all the hard work you put into constructing the family tree, Chromecast is for you. The Google Chromecast HDMI Streaming Media Player currently sells for $35 and takes a mere 5 to 10 minutes to set up.

Even though I’m Lisa’s daughter, I am not a techie person at all, so if I can do it in just a few minutes without help, you can too!

 

How to Use Chromecast
After you’ve completed the initial set up, simply open the app you want to stream (YouTube, for example) and tap the Chromecast icon. Streaming is now enabled. (Chromecast primarily works over wifi, but Google recently announced that Ethernet cables are now available as an alternative.)

While streaming, you control the app functions on your mobile device or computer. For example, if you’re streaming a movie from the Netflix app on your iPad, you would play, pause, and make your selections directly on your iPad. If you want to switch back to viewing on your mobile device (or simply stop streaming), tap the Chromecast icon again.

Dozens of photo and video apps are compatible with Chromecast and all are listed on their website. Here are a few that I think genealogists will really enjoy, and they’re all available on both The App Store and Google Play:

photosPhoto Cast for Chromecast
Free
Premium Upgrades – $2.99 and up

albums for Google ChromecastWhen you open the app, you can view all the photos and videos (including TV shows or movies you may have purchased) on your device. You can also create slideshows by picking individual photos or entire albums and adding songs from your music library. Then tap the Chromecast icon to instantly stream to your TV. It has four viewing modes available. Photo streaming has very little lag, but video streaming could take a little longer to load, depending on your wifi speeds. Multiple devices can stream to the same TV, and slideshows can continue to play on the TV while you use your mobile device for other tasks.

chromecast goog;e slidesGoogle Slides
Free
Google Slides is an ideal tool for Chromecast because it is linked directly to your Google account. I recommend using Google Slides from your laptop or desktop because you can pull pictures from your hard drive (or anywhere – you’re not limited only to the pictures on your mobile device). And personally I find I can work much more efficiently with a full mouse and keyboard for this kind of project. You can create a wonderfully detailed and multi-media slide show or presentation. Then, download the app to your mobile device and your presentations will be accessible there as well. I find streaming from your tablet works a little better than streaming from your computer, but you can still stream from a computer as long as it’s connected to wifi and is close enough to the TV to detect Chromecast.

Chromecast youtube iconYouTube
Free
Chromecast youtube app screenChromecast offers you an easy and convenient way to watch videos from our Genealogy Gems YouTube channel and other favorites on your TV! Open the YouTube app and tap the Chromecast icon. Browse videos as usual. When you select one to watch, it will stream to your TV with no loss of video or audio quality. You can also create a TV queue, specifically for videos you want to watch on the big screen. Tap on a video and a pop-up will ask to either play it or add it to your TV queue. The best part? YouTube will continue to play your video on your TV even if you minimize the app on your device to do other tasks. Before you finish your viewing session, be sure to tap the Subscribe button at the Genealogy Gems YouTube channel so you’ll have easy access to all current and new videos.

Desktop Streaming
Streaming from your desktop browser is another great feature. Anything you are viewing on your browser (videos, audio, website content, etc.) can be projected to your TV. You will need the current version of the Chrome web browser, as well as the Chromecast extension installed. In my personal experience I found streaming video from my browser to be a bit slow and choppy, but results may vary based on browser settings and wifi speeds. It’s worth a try, and I wouldn’t be surprised if this technology continues to evolve and improve.

TIP: How to Update Chrome
Normally, Chrome updates automatically in the background when you open and close your browser. But here’s how to check if you have the most current version of Chrome:

  1. Open Google Chrome.
  2. In the top right, click the Chrome menu
  3. Click About Google Chrome.
  4. The current version number is the series of numbers beneath the “Google Chrome” heading. Chrome will check for updates when you’re on this page.
  5. Click Relaunch to apply any available update.

Another cool thing about Chromecast:
Once you have Chromecast set up, your devices will detect any Chromecast that is nearby, whether it’s yours or someone else’s. So if you’re at a family member’s home and they have Chromecast, you can stream from your device to their TV as well! Can you say “time to share the latest version of the family tree?”

Again, as a non-techie I found Chromecast to be very user-friendly, and a huge value for the price. There are loads of fun apps to explore (music, podcasts, interactive games, and even a karaoke app!). Happy streaming!

thanks youre a gemP.S. If you decide to purchase Chromecast, will you please use this link? Purchasing through our site supports the free Genealogy Gems podcast and all the free content on our website.

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